Category Archives: Technical Shipwreck Diving Blog

Fighting against 40-footers, Frank Mays recalls surviving the sinking of the Carl D. Bradley

This is a very interesting interview with Frank Mays, now 85 years young, telling the story of his survival this day in 1958 as the big freighter Carl D. Bradley slipped underneath the waves during a November gale storm.  Listen to the interview here…                   Shipwreck Explorers […]

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Diver shares what it’s like to photograph Great Lakes shipwrecks

Listen to Becky Kagan Schott as she describes her passion for diving and documenting shipwrecks in the Great Lakes from the time she first dived several shipwrecks 23 years ago in murky brown Lake Erie to coming back seven years ago into much clearer waters, due to the zebra and quagga mussels, in Lake Erie, […]

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North America’s Great Lakes – X-Ray Mag #79

There are other areas of the world with well preserved shipwrecks, but the Great Lakes of North America have the monopoly on sheer mass, variety and relative ease of access.  Very few known dive-able wrecks are much more than a few hour’ boat ride from a decent restaurant, a chain hotel or a decent-sized town.  […]

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Deep Blue Article by Marcela Jones

When Jitka Hanakova, 38, looks out at Lake Michigan, she doesn’t see sunrises and sailboats. Instead, she imagines what lies beneath the water’s surface. An estimated 170 shipwrecks rest within 5 square nautical miles of Milwaukee’s shore – meaning customers of her dive charter business, Shipwreck Explorers, needn’t go far to experience the eeriness and […]

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Survey of A.A. Parker reveals a fascinating Shipwreck

“On the second dive, I was exploring around the stern and I looked up, right there, was the name A.A. Parker, all nicely painted. At that moment you know for sure what wreck you’re on.” Said Techincal Diver Erik Foreman. The Great Lakes Historical Shipwreck Society discovered the location the A.A.Parker in 2001 with their […]

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